Tag Archives: Medway

Helping Schools

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We provide dance teachers for clubs in lots of schools in Medway and Kent, but that’s not all we do, we also support them to make the clubs successful. We help them to because we want to give as many people the chance to dance as possible. With more participants taking part, the schools can make funding go further or they can make a profit to put back into the school and put towards other things. 
 
We recently sent an email out to the schools we currently work containing ideas for the best ways to do this. It talked about marketing their dance clubs, how we can help with that and what type of club might work best. I thought it might be useful to others so here are the ideas! Obviously some of the ideas won’t be quite the same if the club isn’t run with TRS Teachers, but the general gist of it works and we wish you the best of luck making dance happen in your school!
 
– Use a poster!
We have a number of posters that can be printed and have club details written on them. You can print them or we are happy to print them for you. We also have a more general poster that tells people we support your school with dance and that would apply to Educating Dance, events and training as well as clubs. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
– Hold an assembly!
Pay for your dance teacher’s time so they can come in for 30 minutes to help the dancers perform. Then you can tell all the children about dance club and get them enthusiastic. Letters could go out on the same day to keep the momentum going. We’ve found this to be the most effective way to boost numbers and have filled clubs immediately this way in the past.
 
– A video performance!
Your dance teacher can film the class doing a recent routine and this can be shared to pupils and parents to encourage others to join. We provide the relevant recorded image consent forms and will send you the finished video as well as sharing it ourselves. Below is a video that TRS Teacher, Steph made for Byron Primary School recently. This video was made because Steph was so proud of the group for working so hard, but a show to parents wasn’t possible because clubs are held on Friday afternoons. 
 
 
– Text and email reminders
Sometimes parents want their children to go to club, but they forget that it’s on. A reminder text or email for the first few weeks or if numbers drop helps with this.
 
– Make sure the club is right for your pupils
Sometimes a dance style that works in one school doesn’t work in another. We can easily change the style to something the children will enjoy more or, if you book for the year, the style can change every term. We have a large team of teachers so you can choose from a large range of dance styles. Find out more HERE.
 
–  Check the age range.
We’ve found that clubs are more popular if they have a specific age range that isn’t too wide. For example one or two year group(s) per club works well, but years R-6 is rarely successful. Unfortunately, with a wider age range and only one dance teacher, the session can’t be differentiated successfully and older pupils end up supporting the younger ones and not learning themselves. Sometimes younger pupils also feel intimidated.
 
– Integrate Dance
The more pupils understand and trust the fun of dance, the more they want to do. Schools that provide Educating Dance classes also have more successful clubs because dancing becomes normal and gets talked about. One Off events work in a similar way and often boost participant numbers immediately following the event. 
 
– A dance display board

We can provide you with the things needed to make a display board about dance club. We will organise for photo consent to be obtained, take and print photos and add club details (including what they’ve been doing, logos and a leaflet etc.). We give all these things to the school to put up. This way the finished product can match the school’s current displays.

I hope that was helpful! We have more examples of schools that have run really successful clubs so we can help further. Please ask about any of this, we are here to help and want dance to reach as many people as possible.

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Healthy Weight Summit

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Yesterday A Better Medway held the 2018 Healthy Weight Summit and I went along with TRS Teacher and franchise owner, Georgie, to find out more.

The day opened with a speech by Councillor David Brake who talked about helping our community achieve a healthy weight, eat a balanced diet and be more active. He talked about our collective wisdom and said we would be “Working together to support Medway residents to adopt healthier lifestyles and achieve a healthy weight.”

The together theme continued and the thing that has struck me most about the day is that the people there want to work in partnership, build connections and network. Why wouldn’t they, together we can do more than one individual. This ties in really well with The Right Step’s plans for the next month as we get involved with the Age of Creativity Festival. For 2018 their focus is partnership. It’s more than a co-incidence that partnership seems to be the buzz word when talking about weight as well as when discussing arts. Partnership is the way forward, with cuts taking place across the country, the only way to make things happen is to utilize the resources and skills that are already out there. The people are out there and we’re going to find them!

20180925_103119After Councillor Brake, Scott Elliot, Head of Health and Wellbeing Services and, in my opinion, a driving force when it comes to getting Medway healthy and active, talked about what has happened in the year since the last Healthy Weight Summit. He discussed how trends in obesity in Medway are relatively static and similar or slightly above average in comparison to the rest of the country.

20180925_105548The thing that shocked us most though was information found in the following graph. I took a photo of the slide so it may not be clear, but the graph suggests that 63.3% of adults are inactive in the UK. I Tweeted whilst there and found out that this includes adults up to the age of 65. Since then I have also spoken to Scott and have discovered that the drop in activity around 65 / 70 years old is huge, he compared it to a a cliff edge and commented that this has something to do with retirement. We didn’t go into further detail at the time, but this is interesting to me due to our work with older adults and older frail adults. I’m sure the Active Armchairs Facilitators would agree with me, we see the inactivity and we see why regularly. See our Twitter feed for more about this.

I hadn’t realised how many brilliant initiatives are already taking place in Medway and still, new ideas are being developed. These include the Health Walks, cycling groups and, of course, the Better Medway Champions.

The reality is, we are all part of the solution. Scott Elliot

I was especially interested in what Penny Lazell, Physical Activity Nurse Clinical Champion about health professionals delivering the message of the importance of physical activity for wellbeing. She has a long road ahead of her, but it sounds like a great initiative. Physical Activity is a large part of personal wellbeing and it’s important to get this message out in hospitals. Even the smallest movement counts and activity is different for every person, but it is still key.

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James Williams, Director for Public Health also spoke. He inspired everyone to go out there and get things done and said it’s “an equalities plan, not all about obesity.” He means that we need to look at all the parts of the jigsaw puzzle that is health (another theme of the day!).

 

20151123_110539At The Right Step we are well aware of the importance of partnership, we are a team of community dance practitioners who work together to do more than any individual could. That is who we are. We also see how dance can be a bridge between arts and sport and therefore is an excellent medium for improving health and wellbeing.

We are always developing though and, moving forward, the summit has encouraged me to look deeper into the type of partnerships we make outside of The Right Step. We work with many schools and care homes, but how else can we partner in order to take dance to more places? This is something for me to explore. For now, I can share some of the work we already have with regards to dance, fitness and weight. Here is a link to all of our blog posts about health and wellbeing…
http://www.therightstepdc.co.uk/category/health-and-wellbeing/ 
We will be discussing all of these things in our next All Hands Meeting (a meeting for all the TRS Teachers that is held twice a year) and we will be speaking to Scott further about how we can reach more of the right people.

I will end with a quote from Scott. I met with him this morning (less than 24 hours after the very busy summit!) and asked him about his thoughts on partnership.

It’s the informalities of partnership and networking that makes them what they are. My quote about partnership would be taken from M Riley who said ‘Start somewhere, follow them everywhere.’ Problems are only going to be solved by working together and we will improve social isolation, community engagement and everything that overlaps. That is why this agenda is such a passion for me.

 

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The Value of Arts

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On Thursday 22nd February artists and interested people gathered to contemplate the value of art and to share their experiences. I went along to not only provide a workshop about Active Armchairs, but to also discover what other artists have been up to in Medway and Kent.

Valuing Art & Culture in Medway and Kent was organised by Laura King of Look Kloser and Luci Napleton from Medway Council after Laura shared her idea for a day to encourage collaboration. It all began with a chat at Medway Dance Network and snowballed from there.

I took part in Laura’s workshop where she told us how all of her sessions are open for anyone, no matter what and reminded us of the importance of pausing for participants. Georgia Smith, representing Loop Dance Company (yes, she’s also a TRS Teacher and our Adult Dance Co-ordinator, she wears many hats!), share her ideas for a cohesive approach to a dance class for children. We discussed the difference between creative dance and cross-curricular dance and came to the conclusion that it’s like a Hoover… all cross-curricular dance is creative, but not all creative dance is cross-curricular. Luci shared her experiences with EDNA and we were treated to the rare opportunity to relax and gather our thoughts.

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Everyone in the room is part of Active Armchairs. When family, friends and carers are present we can facilitate special moments for them.

Lastly was my workshop about Active Armchairs. My aim was to give everyone a flavour of what Active Armchairs is, to talk about the importance of choice and to inspire everyone with some Magic Moments. Luckily I was joined by fellow Active Armchairs facilitator, Georgie, who was able to share her favourite moments as well.

The day was a great reminder that there is a wealth of dance expertise out there. Although we do a lot of skills sharing at The Right Step, CPD and sharing is with other is always good for the soul!

In the evening we went to the hall, still at Woodlands Arts Centre, where there were tables and a big screen. Guests arrived and speakers shared their stories of collaboration. There was a great mix of people from various organisations and the general idea was to find a way to collaborate and make art happen.

Speakers were asked what they think is the value of arts and I think the resulting list is all true…

  • A sense of purpose and achievement
  • Prevents social isolation
  • Self worth
  • Opportunity for learning
  • A feeling of belonging

I know I found some opportunities for collaboration and I’m sure others there did too. I had a day of contemplation and came away buoyant.

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