Tag Archives: Kent

Helping Schools

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We provide dance teachers for clubs in lots of schools in Medway and Kent, but that’s not all we do, we also support them to make the clubs successful. We help them to because we want to give as many people the chance to dance as possible. With more participants taking part, the schools can make funding go further or they can make a profit to put back into the school and put towards other things. 
 
We recently sent an email out to the schools we currently work containing ideas for the best ways to do this. It talked about marketing their dance clubs, how we can help with that and what type of club might work best. I thought it might be useful to others so here are the ideas! Obviously some of the ideas won’t be quite the same if the club isn’t run with TRS Teachers, but the general gist of it works and we wish you the best of luck making dance happen in your school!
 
– Use a poster!
We have a number of posters that can be printed and have club details written on them. You can print them or we are happy to print them for you. We also have a more general poster that tells people we support your school with dance and that would apply to Educating Dance, events and training as well as clubs. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
– Hold an assembly!
Pay for your dance teacher’s time so they can come in for 30 minutes to help the dancers perform. Then you can tell all the children about dance club and get them enthusiastic. Letters could go out on the same day to keep the momentum going. We’ve found this to be the most effective way to boost numbers and have filled clubs immediately this way in the past.
 
– A video performance!
Your dance teacher can film the class doing a recent routine and this can be shared to pupils and parents to encourage others to join. We provide the relevant recorded image consent forms and will send you the finished video as well as sharing it ourselves. Below is a video that TRS Teacher, Steph made for Byron Primary School recently. This video was made because Steph was so proud of the group for working so hard, but a show to parents wasn’t possible because clubs are held on Friday afternoons. 
 
 
– Text and email reminders
Sometimes parents want their children to go to club, but they forget that it’s on. A reminder text or email for the first few weeks or if numbers drop helps with this.
 
– Make sure the club is right for your pupils
Sometimes a dance style that works in one school doesn’t work in another. We can easily change the style to something the children will enjoy more or, if you book for the year, the style can change every term. We have a large team of teachers so you can choose from a large range of dance styles. Find out more HERE.
 
–  Check the age range.
We’ve found that clubs are more popular if they have a specific age range that isn’t too wide. For example one or two year group(s) per club works well, but years R-6 is rarely successful. Unfortunately, with a wider age range and only one dance teacher, the session can’t be differentiated successfully and older pupils end up supporting the younger ones and not learning themselves. Sometimes younger pupils also feel intimidated.
 
– Integrate Dance
The more pupils understand and trust the fun of dance, the more they want to do. Schools that provide Educating Dance classes also have more successful clubs because dancing becomes normal and gets talked about. One Off events work in a similar way and often boost participant numbers immediately following the event. 
 
– A dance display board

We can provide you with the things needed to make a display board about dance club. We will organise for photo consent to be obtained, take and print photos and add club details (including what they’ve been doing, logos and a leaflet etc.). We give all these things to the school to put up. This way the finished product can match the school’s current displays.

I hope that was helpful! We have more examples of schools that have run really successful clubs so we can help further. Please ask about any of this, we are here to help and want dance to reach as many people as possible.

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The Value of Arts

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On Thursday 22nd February artists and interested people gathered to contemplate the value of art and to share their experiences. I went along to not only provide a workshop about Active Armchairs, but to also discover what other artists have been up to in Medway and Kent.

Valuing Art & Culture in Medway and Kent was organised by Laura King of Look Kloser and Luci Napleton from Medway Council after Laura shared her idea for a day to encourage collaboration. It all began with a chat at Medway Dance Network and snowballed from there.

I took part in Laura’s workshop where she told us how all of her sessions are open for anyone, no matter what and reminded us of the importance of pausing for participants. Georgia Smith, representing Loop Dance Company (yes, she’s also a TRS Teacher and our Adult Dance Co-ordinator, she wears many hats!), share her ideas for a cohesive approach to a dance class for children. We discussed the difference between creative dance and cross-curricular dance and came to the conclusion that it’s like a Hoover… all cross-curricular dance is creative, but not all creative dance is cross-curricular. Luci shared her experiences with EDNA and we were treated to the rare opportunity to relax and gather our thoughts.

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Everyone in the room is part of Active Armchairs. When family, friends and carers are present we can facilitate special moments for them.

Lastly was my workshop about Active Armchairs. My aim was to give everyone a flavour of what Active Armchairs is, to talk about the importance of choice and to inspire everyone with some Magic Moments. Luckily I was joined by fellow Active Armchairs facilitator, Georgie, who was able to share her favourite moments as well.

The day was a great reminder that there is a wealth of dance expertise out there. Although we do a lot of skills sharing at The Right Step, CPD and sharing is with other is always good for the soul!

In the evening we went to the hall, still at Woodlands Arts Centre, where there were tables and a big screen. Guests arrived and speakers shared their stories of collaboration. There was a great mix of people from various organisations and the general idea was to find a way to collaborate and make art happen.

Speakers were asked what they think is the value of arts and I think the resulting list is all true…

  • A sense of purpose and achievement
  • Prevents social isolation
  • Self worth
  • Opportunity for learning
  • A feeling of belonging

I know I found some opportunities for collaboration and I’m sure others there did too. I had a day of contemplation and came away buoyant.

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