Categotry Archives: International Dance

Inspiration April

by

This months our social media focus is Inspiration. We’re going along the lines of April, new and inspiring things! With this in mind, we thought we’d share what inspiration we use to plan some of our dance classes and Georgie has written a blog about it. It’s just a little introduction to the many things the TRS Teachers get up to, but it might be helpful when planning a dance lesson. Enjoy!

Written by Georgie, Manager of TRS South Kent

There are so many things you can use for your inspiration for dance classes, from the style of dance to the class topic of the term. Here at TRS we follow guidelines to help us both in our Educating Dance classes as well as our usual dance clubs.

 

You can start with the learning styles to develop your inspiration for your class. These include auditory, visual, kinesthetic (practical/learn by doing) and read write. This will help the dance teacher appeal to all pupils and their various learning styles. We also explore social inspiration and tactile inspiration alongside this. 

Visual is a popular one to use in our classes by our TRS facilitators. Using images throughout the lessons allows those who are visual learners to really grasp the idea. You can use images such as the stages of growth for a plant, the water cycle as well as lots more. Also using videos from online can be very useful and participants respond well to them.

 

For auditory inspiration you can use music, perhaps a particular song that you like or think that the participants will respond well too. Sounds like rain forest, the sea etc. would also work or you can even use some of the participants to create the sounds for the dance, using instruments, instruments they’ve made themselves or body parts like in Gumboot Dancing (photo on the right).

Tactile can be very exciting to use as inspiration, especially for younger ones. You can use different materials and express how they feel through movement, furry, shiny, slimy, rugged, squishy and so on. You can also bring in objects for the participants to explore and study like historical artefacts. Props are also used in many TRS classes and can come in all shapes and sizes, whether you buy pompoms or make your own jingle sticks, these are a great to get everyone involved. A TRS favourite is our tactile scarf. It is made from lots of different materials all tied together to make one giant scarf.

There are also a lot of practical ways to find inspiration for your dance class. These are experienced things so they are often things that are experienced elsewhere and brought into class in other ways such as current events. Fireworks (the bonfire flames in the photo on the left) is a fun theme. You may want to use certain holidays like Easter or even what’s happening around us now. For example, when The Greatest Showman came out everyone was so inspired and excited to use the ideas and music.

Styles of dance can be used as inspiration, you maybe looking at a world theme and you could explore different types of dance from around the world such as Latin, line dancing or Bollywood. Practical inspiration can be as closed or open as you want it to be when using it in your lessons or for your inspiration and it can be shown through other sorts of inspiration that is auditory, visual or tactile. 

Book Week is a great opportunity for us to use read/write inspiration. Books are always a useful tool.

Other ways to find inspiration can include things like focusing on a particular area you want to develop with your participants, for example motor skills, balance or extension. 

So as you can see there are so many ways to find inspiration for your dance class. You can also use a combination of these ideas, especially the learning styles as that way you can ensure that all your participants are gaining from the lesson. TRS teachers will always use a combination in their lessons. Start off with a focus and then you can extend and explore further.

We also love hearing your ideas at TRS, they inspire and challenge us as teachers and that always makes our classes interesting and enjoyable.

Related Images:

World Book Day – St Mary’s Primary

by

This is our third year at St Mary’s Primary School. Their dance week is always fantastic and this year has been no different. The dance sessions are based on world dance styles or themes from the class room such as Weather or Aliens in Space! Steph, Sophie, Rebecca and Shanice have all been to St Mary’s this week. It’s been busy, but great fun. At the end of the week one group from each class will perform to the school, I’m sure the show will be brilliant.

Sophie said…
Country dancing with Year 2
Both classes had fun learning short sequences of traditional English Country dancing. They did very well as the complicated patterns and changing partners can get confusing! To start with, to
get warmed up, we learnt some steps in a circle that we put into the sequences later. Then to get heart rate up and laughter flowing we had a follow the leader the dance with the whole class. We skipped and clapped along to the music as the leader led us around the room and then stopped to make an arch. The line feeds through the arches and a new leader is formed to start over again.

Both classes then learnt ‘This Old Man’, a dance which is danced with partners in a circle or line and at the end of the sequence you swap partners as country dancing is a social dance so you dance with as many different dancers as possible. Once they mastered this the first class learnt ‘The Black Nag’ and the second the ‘Indian Queen’. They were both longer sequences and had more complicated steps and patterns. However, both classes did extremely well and when watched their peers perform. They had lots of praise for each other and could see the patterns made which they couldn’t see when dancing themselves.

I liked the arches and follow the leader dance.
I liked dancing in small groups, it was easier as had more space.
I liked crossing hands with my partner and turning around.
I liked the heel toe dance as I knew the music (This Old Man).

IMG-20160301-WA0004African Gumboot  with Year 4
African Gumboot is all about creating rhythms by stamping and making noise by hitting the sides of welly boots because the style comes from miners communicating with each other with secret rhythms as they weren’t allowed to talk. To start our workshop we walked in the space and, when I stopped, the class had to stop, listen to my rhythm and Echo it back to me. This really worked to get the class listening as I made the rhythms longer and complex.

“I think it’s good that the miners could do gumboot dancing when they were digging for gold because it’s really fun”

I then taught 4 phrases of Gumboot which had 4 different rhythms, we practiced and practiced so that the whole class had it and all you could hear was the rythm. The class then got creative! In small groups they chose one of the rhythms and made up there own. They had to think about making it look interesting so had to think of a formation to stand in. I was amazed at what they came up with! Brilliant ideas and most groups came up with a new way of making sounds. For example, sliding dragging foot along the floor. I wanted to use all their great ideas so we put an idea from each group to make a whole class dance to finish the workshop with a stamp!

I liked working with other people and coming up with own rhythm.
I liked learning about Gumboot dancing and the rhythms.
I liked putting it all together to make a whole group dance.
It was good to watch everybody’s dances.

Related Images:

Christmas Newsletter 2015!

by

We’ve had a fantastic year and couldn’t fit it all in, but we’ve had a good go. So here’s our Christmas newsletter! Try Ctrl scroll to be able to read it better. If that doesn’t work we’re happy to email or post you a copy.

Christmas Newsletter 2015

Related Images:

Slavic Vs Latin Amercian Dance

by

So this week we we were in Greenvale Infants School studying the differences between dances from the North Eastern (in relation to England) and South Western parts of the world as part of their geography workshops.

The whole school was involved with a series of classes held over two days in which we learned elements of a Russian and Hungarian dance notably the Sappoggi and Czardash respectively as well as elements from the Dominican Republic and Cuba with our Merengue and Salsa dance steps.

The aim was to compare the two styles, and actually as a dance teacher this was quite interesting for me too.

I noticed that the basics were very similar… the Merengue two step was very similar to the Czardash, and the basic solo Salsa step a much lighter version of the Sappoggi step. So we then looked at the differences.

A big difference was in costume… with the Russians and Hungarians wrapped up nice and warm agains the elements, and the Latin Americans wearing… well very little actually! I guess being so hot, warm, cosy clothing would not be conducive to dancing. I also noticed that possibly as a result of this, the slavic dances were very much about the costume… such as the dusting snow off the boots in the Sappoggi or the showing of rings on fingers in the Hungarian dances. With Latin American dancing it was still about the costume to some extent with fabulous headdresses or feather skirts being shaken and shimmied, but also very much about the movement of the body and arms.

I will say that much as I love teaching the Hungarian and Russian dances, as they are so strong and proud, I found that the minute I put on a spot of Latin music, the whole room erupted into wiggles! It was fantastic! I wish I had had a video… something about this music just makes you want to wiggle. Which the children really enjoyed.

What a great fun way of learning about two different parts of the world.

A World of Dance

by

World DanceTwo schools are ending the term with a big, World Dance, bang. St Mary’s Primary School and Hoo St Werburg Primary have both organised a whole week of dance workshops that represent the diverse and exciting world of dance.

The first week of workshops was held at St Mary’s Primary School where Steph, Karen, Gemma and Sophie all went in to lead workshops. Every pupil had a go!

Reception used the book, Tydilik, and a video about a cockatoo to learn about Aboriginal Dance.

TRS Teacher, Sophie said ‘I was with reception in the afternoon. We watched a video of an Aboriginal tribe performing a dance about a White Cockatoo. When we got into the hall we tried out some of the steps we had seen and put together a dance. Comments from the class included ‘I like the flying jumps’ and ‘My favourite bit was the funny knees!’

Year 1 had a workshop about Aliens, not quite of our world, but if they’re there we’re sure they’re dancing somewhere!

Year 2’s topic is Britain so Sophie taught them Country Dancing, she said ‘I had an enjoyable day at St Mary’s, staff and children made me feel very welcome. I first had country dancing with year 2 and both classes were focused and got their head around the fancy formations and changing partners! I split the class half and half for everybody to have a chance to perform and watch. Comments from the audience included ‘how we stand in little groups looks good’, ‘I noticed we made a cross with our arms when we went round’. When asked what their favourite part of the dance was one girl said ‘I liked changing partners’.

50s-danceYear 3 had a Rock ‘n’ Roll workshop with a twist, it linked to their topic, The Rainforest so they ended up with a fantastic Rainforest Rock ‘n’ Roll Party!

Year 4 brought in their wellies and did Gumboot dancing, a very loud African dance style.

Year 5 had a South American themed Samba Dance lesson and last, but not least, Year 6 did STOMP, full of rhythms and sounds, this was a very loud session too!

“The Year 4 classes were so musical and rhythmic and the excitement of the wellingtons helped them even more with their expression.”
Steph, TRS Teacher, February 2015

The TRS Teachers, School Teachers and Pupils all decided who they thought had worked hardest at their dances. These small groups performed in a celebration assembly at the end of the week.

“Dancing was great, I tried to pop in on most sessions.  Everything went well and all seemed to run to plan. I’d be more than happy to run something similar next year, finances permitting.
Thank you for all of your help with organising the week, really helped me out and was a great experience for all.”
Miss Jessup, Teacher at St Mary’s Primary School, February 2015

 

IMG_0262
Following the fantastic week at St Mary’s Primary, some more TRS Teachers went to Hoo St Werburg Primary School.

Foundation Stage had a theme that we’d not done before, China. Year 1 did Country Dancing and Year 2 had South American dance, both with Gemma.

“The children were really well behaved and concentrated well. They had nearly an hour and did really well.”
Foundation Stage Teacher at Hoo St Werburg School, February 2015

“The dance sessions today were fantastic, the children seemed to really enjoy it.”
Mr Tyler, Teacher at Hoo St Werburg Primary School after the first day of classes, February 2015

IMG_0288
Over the week Year 3 did Australian, Aboriginal style, dances with Steph and Clare (see the photo on the right), Year 4 danced The Charleston, Year 5 The Samba and Year 6 had Butoh, a Japanese dance style.

“I was really impressed with the dancers’ ability, they picked up steps really quickly and I even had to add extra steps for them.”
Clare, TRS Teacher, February 2015 

At the end of the week there will be a performance assembly to celebrate all the dances that have been learnt!

 

More about what we offer schools can be found HERE.
We are happy to help schools timetable events such as these world dance weeks. We take the stress out of making sure each class has the opportunity to take part and we make sure that each class has the most suitable dance teacher for the style or topic they’ve asked for.

Related Images:

We’ve Gone International!

by

Yes it has been a very multicultural couple of weeks here at  The Right Step.

Our cross curricular classes have really been in full swing. There we use dance to enhance primary school education. And this month we seem to have been travelling the world!

First off we had National dance classes at Greenvale Infants School as part of their music week. Students from the whole school had been learning about different types of music, discovering how music can be quiet, loud, fast, slow and how it can also have different rhythms. They all then learned different national dances, with Reception getting to grips with the stately Polonaise dance from Poland, Year one the Trepak from Russia and Year two mastering the Mazurka also from Poland! Here is a quote from the day:

Processed with Moldiv‘Me and Yatunday were the first and second to be walking down the yellow line. We did Russian dancing. It was brilliant.’
Paige about Russian and Polish Dance at Music Week, Greenvale Infants School, June 2014

This week we moved to warmer climes. With the World Cup, Balfour Infants School had their Brazilian week, Singlewell went all Bollywood on us, and Hilltop Primary School in Frindsbury were learning Samba as part of their Caribbean week.

I was teaching the Samba class and had been warned that some of the lads refused to dance… just didn’t like it. But today they did… all the lads were going for it as we learned the core elements of the Samba movements. Being a fairly complex version of the shimmy, I chose to break it right down for them and was so impressed with the results. We had some fantastic Basic Samba steps going on, we moved on to the Box Step and even got in the Box Step and Kick taking the choreography up a notch. Brilliant stuff.

Hmmm so… where will we be off to next?