The new Ofsted inspection framework draft was published in January 2019 and is currently in review. I might be getting ahead, but it’s important that we begin to think about how dance in schools can be influenced by it and how our extra curricular, cross-curricular and dance for physical activity classes will support schools on providing excellent dance provision. Although dance is a small part of the many things schools do, we want what we do to make a difference, not just to participants, but to the school as a whole. We are already doing great things within schools in Kent, this is just another way to improve what we do. 

You can find the inspection framework here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/education-inspection-framework-draft-for-consultation

Currently inspections do not focus heavily on sport in general, especially in short inspections, but they do look at cultural development and dance could be an indicator of positive participation in cultural activity. Schools can try international dance styles relating to the diverse backgrounds of pupils within the school (read this blog post about when we went to Greenvale Infants and danced familiar dances for pupils such as traditional Polish and Slavic dances), dance that celebrates National Days such as May Day (May Pole Dance or Morris Dance) or historical dance styles taught within our Educating Dance classes (Tudor Dance for example).

Extra curricular provision is something already considered by inspectors, (normally in relation to Pupil Premium and Sport Premium budgets) and this is something we can easily add to the school day. Dance clubs can be varied and tailored to the specific needs of the school. For example, if girls are not responding to PE within school time or if they have lower attendance of clubs, a confidence building dance club is perfect. Alternatively, if the school wants to encourage creativity, a Creative Dance Club (EYFS – KS2) or Choreography Club (KS3 – 4) would support this aim.

In terms of evidencing value for money, two of our company aims are

  • To provide quality, well organised, accessible dance opportunities for all.
  • To provide paid and voluntary work for dance professionals and to increase the recognition of dance teaching in the community as a career

Our pricing policy reflects this so schools know they can get high quality dance clubs at reasonable prices. We even have deals for long term bookings and MATs who book for multiple schools. Schools are able to make a profit from our classes easily, if they choose to, and this can be put towards other things. For more information about using PE and Sport Premium Funding for dance please read One Dance UK’s funding document, https://www.onedanceuk.org/programme/children-young-people/dance-in-schools/ and, if you would like to know how we can help specifically to make clubs successful, please see our blog post.

In her speech at Youth Sport Trust 2019 Conference, Ofsted’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Speilman, admits that currently inspections are heavily tilted towards data and says that the new framework will look at what matters to children, “What are they being taught and how? How are they being set up to succeed in the next stage of their lives?” Read the transcript here, https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/amanda-spielman-at-the-youth-sport-trust-2019-conference

At TRS, the content of our classes, what children are being taught, has always been extremely important. We plan with the individual participants in mind, use school themes and topics and make sure participants learn best practice and teach safe dance technique that is appropriate to the type of class. Our dance teachers are not observed during Ofsted inspections as they aren’t faculty members, but that doesn’t stop the odd inspector enjoying a moment watching a happy dance class and it doesn’t mean the TRS Teachers aren’t working to high standards all the time. It does mean that our teachers are not teaching for tests and have to freedom to educate the whole child, preparing them for further dance education or life in general. There are a lot of blogs out there about how dance makes great people!

We must also look at how school teachers can provide great dance lessons during school time. Although we provide Educating Dance classes for schools, it is sometimes more appropriate for a school to provide training for their staff so they can deliver appropriate and effective dance classes themselves. In our training, Dance: A Cross-curricular Approach and Dance in the EYFS, we provide school staff with the tools and confidence to do this. Our cross-curricular flow chart gives them the framework they need to design and deliver high quality dance lessons. Dance can be a fantastic tool for improving how the curriculum is taught and is excellent for a thematic, creative approach.

In terms of monitoring, evaluation and impact,  the Educating Dance teachers are always happy to provide feedback and we can support the school on this. We also ask class participants for feedback at least once a year. Our CPD for school staff can also have an additional mentoring side to support staff and the SLT with evaluating progress. All of the TRS Teachers are up to date with the relevant legislation and this makes it easy for schools to ensure they have up to date records as well.

To find out more about the new framework and the EYFS in general, see Nursery World’s review of the plans.

https://www.nurseryworld.co.uk/nursery-world/news/1166634/education-inspection-framework-2019-key-changes-for-early-years

It is no secret that dance classes can provide for broad and rich learning. A varied approach to dance including physical activity, learning and development is key to a quality dance lesson. There are plenty of ideas within our blog, but we are just a phone call or email away if anyone would like advice about dance in schools. I have a passion for excellent dance education for all and, as Director of The Right Step, I’m able to pass this passion and my experience onto the TRS Teachers. We are here to help the schools (inc. EYFS settings), and other organisations, we work with meet the aims set by governing bodies such as Ofsted as well as aims set within schools themselves.